Quartz Countertops

With low maintenance, high durability and endless color choices, engineered quartz offers a tempting alternative to natural stone countertops. Boasting the best qualities of laminate and stone (along with its own special features), quartz began appearing in U.S. homes just a few years ago after gaining popularity in Europe for the past decade. Although some quartz countertops are actually made of quarried slabs of the natural stone, the new engineered material is actually created through a manufacturing process that mixes approximately 93 percent ground natural quartz with 5 percent polymer resins. The result is a super-hard, low-maintenance, natural stone-look countertop available in a dazzling array of colors. And for many of the homeowners choosing quartz, those virtually unlimited color options are what sold them. Quartz resists staining or corrosion from cooking oils, liquids and most household cleaning products — so there's no need for periodic resealing of the surface. Quartz can be damaged by excessive heat, however, so homeowners should use trivets or heating pads.

Quartz countertops allow for a variety of edging options, just like natural stone. Unlike stone, however, engineered quartz also offers other design possibilities. Because it's more flexible to work with and is held in place using glue and epoxy instead of screws, quartz can be used on larger vertical surfaces like backsplashes and even shower enclosures, without the fissures and seams often all too visible with natural stone. Also, because engineered quartz is significantly heavier than other stone surfaces, there are some special installation considerations.


Profiles

Our profile options for quartz countertops. The edge profiles do not apply to Cambria Quartz countertops.


2cm Edge Profiles

Standard
Upcharge


3cm Edge Profiles

Standard
Upcharge

4cm Edge Profiles